Thinkbelt

Interstitial EP030

Improvised Cities
by Helen Gyger

Tracing the evolution of aided self-help housing in Peru over three decades beginning in the 1950s, Helen Gyger contemplates how this hands-on model for improving squatter settlements persisted under different political regimes, competing ideological agendas, and strained expert-resident relations.

FEATURED CONTRIBUTOR

Helen Gyger is a historian of the built environment whose work employs an interdisciplinary perspective, encompassing the formal—visual, material and spatial—qualities of construction, as well as its social, cultural and political dimensions. Her research focuses on three areas: the architecture and urbanism of Latin America; debates framing the conception, design and construction of mass housing projects, as well as residents’ lived experiences of such projects; and contemporary patterns of urban informality, considered as a global phenomenon. Gyger is the author of Improvised Cities: Architecture, Urbanization, and Innovation in Peru (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019) and the co-editor of Latin American Modern Architectures: Ambiguous Territories (Routledge, 2013). She has degrees in studio art from Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney, a Master’s in Liberal Studies from the New School for Social Research, New York, and a PhD in the History and Theory of Architecture from Columbia University.

FEATURED BOOK

'' book cover

More Info

TITLE
Improvised Cities: Architecture, Urbanization, and Innovation in Peru
AUTHOR
Helen Gyger
PUBLISHER
University of Pittsburgh Press
PAGES
456
PUBLICATION DATE
March 2019

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